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Workshops

To supplement the general presentation and themes in the Manor House we also offer Workshop Sessions by a member of our Education Team on a wide variety of themes.

These last between 30 and 40 minutes and are held in the Manor, Education Centre, Barn or (weather permitting) on the Courtyard. The cost is £2 per head. Minimum 15 students or minimum charge of £30 per workshop

The Written Word

Reading and writing is something that we all take for granted now but in the 16th and 17th centuries very few people could do either. Did you know, for instance, that ink was made by hand using oak galls? This is an interactive workshop where the making of ink is demonstrated and then the children are given the opportunity to use it and learn to write with hand-cut quills.
40 minute session.

 

Meet the Servant

What was life like in the 17th century? Now is your chance to find out. One of the servants of the Manor will be put in the hot seat and children given the opportunity to quiz them on any aspect of their life.

  • What did people eat?
  • How much did they earn?
  • Did the children of the Manor go to school and how did the Civil War affect daily life?

These and any other questions will be answered.

30 minute session.

Children's Lives in the Seventeenth Century

This half-hour workshop encompasses a variety of topics to give a broad overview of the main aspects of daily life for children in Tudor and Stuart times. It compares the main differences between the lives of modern children and those who lived in the seventeenth century.

Children are encouraged to think about this by looking at a number of themes, including the differences between the lives of rich and poor children, as well as the educational opportunities available to boys and girls in the seventeenth century. The workshop will finish with an interactive section on the different toys and games children in the seventeenth century.

The Medicine Chest

The medical profession occupied an important place in 17th century society. There were physicians, surgeons, apothecaries and herb wives. Physicians fees were far too expensive for any but the wealthy and the art of the Barber Surgeon, a gruesome one by today’s standards.

Many people both rich and poor had the knowledge to make simple cures and this workshop will give children the chance to have a go at making cures as well as learning about all the other strands of medicine available at the time.
30-40 minute session.

Food and Feasting

It is very easy these days to buy and cook food. A simple trip to the supermarket and cooking it in an oven or microwave is something we are all familiar with. In the 17th century, however, things were not that simple. This workshop discusses the origins of food from vegetables grown in the garden to the exotic fruit shipped in for the very wealthy. It gives students the opportunity to actively learn about and take part in food related etiquette and manners. It will answer all the questions you ever wanted to know such as: How and where were dishes washed without running water? And how was food kept fresh without fridges and freezers? This is a 30-40 minute session.

Barber Surgeon

In the medical profession today, surgeons are highly respected individuals. This was not the case in the 17th century. Barber-Surgeons learnt their trade by watching others at work and had no formal training. This, coupled with a lack of anaesthetics meant that being operated on was a risky business. In this workshop, the Barber-Surgeon discusses his job, his place in the medical profession and demonstrates the tools of his trade.
30-40 minute session.

Llancaiach Fawr – then and now

In the 16th century Llancaiach Fawr was built by the Prichard family - members of the Glamorgan gentry. By 1645 Colonel Edward Prichard owned the majority of the surrounding land as far as Merthyr and had tenants and servants to help him run the estate but when he died in 1655 the Manor was sold out of the family for lack of a male heir. It then became just a working farm contributing to the rural economy of the area. The Williams family were the last private owners and farmed here until 1979 when it was bought by Rhymney Valley District Council.

Rosemary Williams is a woman uniquely placed to understand the roles of landowner and servant. She lived and worked at Llancaiach when her father owned it and she now plays the part of the Enid Samuel, the Chief Dairy Maid at the Manor in the year 1645. Come and hear about her life in both the seventeenth and twentieth centuries and ask questions of a woman who has one foot in the past.
30 – 40 minutes.

Mini Court Session

Students can take part in a court session in the Great Hall of the Manor House. Children can become judge. Jury and even defendants to be brought before the local Justice giving them the opportunity to learn about seventeenth century crime and punishment.

Looking for more?

We can arrange a DAY PACKAGE tailored to your needs. Combine a tour of the Manor with three workshops to create a full day of activities to suit the particular requirements of your group for only £10 per student.

Civil War Day Package 

includes three workshops selected from pike drill, meet the servant, barber surgery and Weapons and warfare.

Please contact Louise Griffith, Learning Manager 01443 412248.